Answered By: Jeremy Darrington
Last Updated: May 19, 2017     Views: 21

If one work is both quoted and cited in another source, the closest example is to treat it as if it is a work in anthology

It is critical as a matter of scholarly integrity to make it clear to your reader if you have not used the "embedded" source in its entirety, but only a part of it at second hand. You might do this by saying in your paper something like, "According to X, scholar Y concludes '....'" You don't want a professor, or anyone else, to assume you have seen/read/used scholar Y's work when in fact you just saw a snippet of it, chosen by someone else.

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